Saturday, December 26, 2009

Sarah Palin for Christmas.

That is right, out of the numerous exceptional presents I received this Christmas, one was Sarah Palin's just released best seller, Going Rogue. Over the course of eight long hours, four hundred pages, and numerous licks to the fingertips, I just completed one of the best books I have ever read, and with a warm heart, offer this review of an superb book.

Sarah Palin is not a political elitist, she was not destined to be successful in politics because of personal wealth or political kingmakers, but she was successful due to a personal drive to succeed, and Providence. Sarah Palin is what Americans have been longing for, a politician who is not a politician, but just a regular American who cares about the citizens, in a sense, a modern version of George Washington or Davy Crockett.

While reading the passages of Sarah Palin's teenage years in Alaska, it reminds me of living in Upstate New York, and even a few personal traits. Such as a love for politics at a young age, being a good athlete while not the best, and a deep admiration for C.S. Lewis. I was not reading the words of a person destined to succeed, but of the words of the average small town American who believed she could succeed.

From the interesting stories of hunting Moose to running for elected office in Wasilla, this book offers more detailed insight of a brilliant American, of whom we suspected of brilliance with little insight. We also see hints of future political runs, whether it indicates a run for United States Senate or President of the United States, it appears her campaign would be run with professionalism, the McCain campaign lacked at times.

Before reading this book, I never understood the importance of Alaska's oil reserves as Sarah Palin does, or even her admiration with Facebook as a indication of Capitalistic greatness and blessings we thrive in as Americans. Though, Alaska is discussed in great detail, Palin also refers to the importance of the tenth amendment in the United States Constitution, something of great importance during this time of federal encroachment on the various states.

In conclusion, this one of the greatest books I have ever read. While not has sophisticated as a recent book, I read of George Washington, and not as simple as Glenn Beck's Common Sense, Going Rogue will offer a personal insight into one of the most interesting Conservative intellectuals and leaders of the Conservative movement, and I believe the foundation for future political accomplishments and ambitions.

Purchase this wonderful book, you will not regret it. It made one hell of a Christmas present for this Palin fan, it could also serve as one hell of a wakeup call for Independents who are unsure of Sarah Palin, and have not conducted personal research beyond the scope of media reporting, which is biased and rooting against one of the greatest political gifts we have encountered in three decades.

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6 comments:

Greg said...

Enjoyed your review. I've just started reading Going Rogue, and so far it's great. I've even read a lot of reviews by staunch liberals who have come away with a new found respect, if not support, for Sarah Palin. Once you start getting respect, support can and often does follow. Some liberal reviewers seem almost resigned to the fact that she will become president sooner rather than later.

I've added your site to my list of favorites.

DEO said...

I just completed one of the best books I have ever read,

_____________________________

I take it it was your first.

Carol said...

I can see the BANK from my house

Harrison said...

I like Sarah Palin but I'm not sure she's done enough to warrant an autobiography (Obama's in the same boat). She'll make some cash and we'll all learn what we know before... she wasn't treated fairly, her ideas weren't taken seriously, and she's made some tough choices in her life.

DEO said...

Four hundred pages after her shaky start, Palin closes Going Rogue with an e-mail note from a misinformed Alaska admirer that tells readers – erroneously – that she “constructed and enacted a new system of splitting the oil profits called ‘ACES,’ which was responsible for Alaskans elevating their economic status “from being merely wealthy to being filthy rich.” While there’s nothing new about misinformation on the Internet, when myth and misinformation start creeping into the psyches of large groups of citizens, it’s time to set the record straight: The most one might credit Palin for in this case is the act of convening a special state legislative session in late 2007 to deal with oil production tax issues. The bill she presented, which she dubbed ACES (”Alaska’s Clear and Equitable Share”), was not an “entirely new way of calculating Alaska’s share,” as she would have readers believe. Rather, Palin’s ACES proposal merely fine-tuned the new, cost-based production tax system enacted by her predecessors the year before she arrived on the scene as governor. Nor is the claim that Palin’s work made Alaska “filthy rich” based on facts. According to a detailed analysis of the ACES legislation in the Oil & Gas Journal, as oil prices soared during the first year the ACES legislation was in place, the Palin modifications accounted for less than four percent of the state’s total petroleum revenue. In fact, a much larger share of the gains realized that year resulted from the Legislature’s rejection and reversal of key elements of the Palin’s ACES proposal.

Why would someone choose to end an autobiography with information that simply isn’t true?

DEO said...

Four hundred pages after her shaky start, Palin closes Going Rogue with an e-mail note from a misinformed Alaska admirer that tells readers – erroneously – that she “constructed and enacted a new system of splitting the oil profits called ‘ACES,’ which was responsible for Alaskans elevating their economic status “from being merely wealthy to being filthy rich.” While there’s nothing new about misinformation on the Internet, when myth and misinformation start creeping into the psyches of large groups of citizens, it’s time to set the record straight: The most one might credit Palin for in this case is the act of convening a special state legislative session in late 2007 to deal with oil production tax issues. The bill she presented, which she dubbed ACES (”Alaska’s Clear and Equitable Share”), was not an “entirely new way of calculating Alaska’s share,” as she would have readers believe. Rather, Palin’s ACES proposal merely fine-tuned the new, cost-based production tax system enacted by her predecessors the year before she arrived on the scene as governor. Nor is the claim that Palin’s work made Alaska “filthy rich” based on facts. According to a detailed analysis of the ACES legislation in the Oil & Gas Journal, as oil prices soared during the first year the ACES legislation was in place, the Palin modifications accounted for less than four percent of the state’s total petroleum revenue. In fact, a much larger share of the gains realized that year resulted from the Legislature’s rejection and reversal of key elements of the Palin’s ACES proposal.

Why would someone choose to end an autobiography with information that simply isn’t true?